Sunday, November 15, 2009


I am keenly awaiting the arrival of a dedicated ebook reader - one small enough to take anywhere. I am currently investigating the Kindle, but until the new version hits Oz (currently only available in the US) I will have to be patient. The portability and the current nature of titles is what appeals to me - over Project Gutenberg and other copyright free sources. They are fantastic, but limited for young readers and I think this might be the future for them.
Although I love nothing more than curling up with a real book, I think that young people will be wanting to access their books electronically.
There is enormous debate by we oldies, but if they are reading and enjoying reading, does it matter the medium they choose to access??

I want to properly investigate the realities of reading in this way. So far, I have only read downloaded books on my laptop - not my preferred method by a long shot. However, this is going to be reality for many very soon.

Monday, November 2, 2009

Online video

YouTube and TeacherTube can provide rich resources for so many curriculum areas and interest areas. School networks can be problematic when linking to video - it often freezes. Respecting copyright also becomes an issue. We now have Clickview and with 24/7 are able to add video content which students are able to access through compressed files - much healthier for our network. Also, it is and easy matter for students to embed short segments of video into presentations.
Although online video is a really poular format for students, they do encounter problems of seamless access.


I have been accessing Radio National podcasts for years. There is an incredible wealth of material available and although some programs are too long to be used in their entirety with students, it is easy to focus in on relevant elements. By adding RSS feeds, these are particularly helpful for senior students, in Biology, Modern History and Economics. They have access to material which is authoritative, current and interesting. Although it is not necessary to have an mp3 player, the portability of this medium allows for access when walking the dog or sitting in the car.
The quality of some podcasts for students needs to be checked (as for all resources).

Students love making their own podcasts and software like audacity makes this a simple process and readily accessible.


This site is so slow to add that it becomes frustrating. I did eventually access and created a Rolly, but I would probably use delicious in preference, simply for speed of access. However, as these applications are constantly changing and updating, I will continue to check out Rollyo, as I really like its clean appearance.


Wikis provide a fantastic avenue for application of web 2.0 with students. I really like the possibilities for higher order thinking and evaluation skills which are required to genuinely assess the quality of material uploaded and shared.
Again, we have problems with access as so many spaces are blocked, but once set up, the students just love being able to share their information and thoughts.

I have found that they are far more likely to state their thoughts via this medium than to speak them aloud, in case they are 'wrong'.

I also see applications for using wikis in the library - just need more time to develop the ideas further.